Skip to content

Paper: Indigenous audio-visual media production and broadcasting – Canadian Examples

Paper: Indigenous audio-visual media production and broadcasting – Canadian Examples published on No Comments on Paper: Indigenous audio-visual media production and broadcasting – Canadian Examples

Budka, P. 2015. Indigenous audio-visual media production and broadcasting – Canadian Examples. Paper at “Eleventh Conference on Hunting and Gathering Societies”, Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna, September 7-11.

Introduction

This is a short position paper that sets out to briefly discuss how indigenous audio-visual media production and broadcasting initiatives haven been developed and maintained in Canada. I am concentrating on television which still is the world’s dominant audio-visual communication medium. What are the specifics of indigenous media (production) and related practices and processes? And what does the future hold for indigenous media projects? Due to limited time at hand, I am only able to open this field of research by presenting two case studies: the national Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) (e.g., Hafsteinsson 2013, Roth 2005) and Wawatay (e.g., Budka 2009, Minore & Hill 1990), a regional communication society in Northern Ontario.

Text (PDF)

Paper: Indigenous futures and digital infrastructures

Paper: Indigenous futures and digital infrastructures published on No Comments on Paper: Indigenous futures and digital infrastructures

Budka, P. 2014. Indigenous futures and digital infrastructures: How First Nation communities connect themselves in Northwestern Ontario. Paper at “13th Biennial Conference of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA)”, Tallinn, Estonia: Tallinn University, 31 July – 3 August.

Introduction

“Now […] if the Aboriginal People could […], retain their tradition, take the technology and go that way in the future. That would be good.”
(Community Development Coordinator and Educational Director, Bearskin Lake First Nation, 2007)

For my first field trip to Northwestern Ontario in 2006, I decided to take the train from Toronto to Sioux Lookout instead of flying. This ride with “the Canadian”, which connects Toronto and Vancouver, took me about 26 hours and demonstrated very vividly the vastness of Ontario. At some point, I could not believe that I have been spending more than an entire day on a train without even leaving the province. But finally I arrived at Sioux Lookout, Northwestern Ontario’s transportation hub, where I would be working with the Keewaytinook Okimakanak Kuhkenah Network (KO-KNET), one of the world’s leading indigenous internet organization.

After my first day at the office, KO-KNET’s coordinator told me that he wants to show me something. So we jumped in his car and drove to the outskirts of the town where he stopped in front of a big satellite dish. Only through this dish, he explained, the remote First Nation communities in the North can be connected to the internet. I was pretty impressed, but had no concrete idea how this really works. So while the satellite dish was physically visible to me, the underlying infrastructure was not. During my stay, I learned more about the technical aspects of internet networks and connectivity, about hubs, switches and cables, and about towers and loops. And I learned that internet via satellite might look impressive, but is actually the last resort and the most expensive way to establish internet connectivity. I also began to realize how important organizational partnerships and collaborative projects are and what important role social relationships across institutional boundaries play. In short: I learned about the infrastructure which is actually necessary to finance, provide and maintain internet access and use. Infrastructure, KO-KNET’s coordinator told me “really defines what you can do and what you can’t do” (KO-KNET coordinator 2007). And this has fundamental consequences for the futures of the region’s indigenous people.

Within this paper I am going to discuss digital infrastructures and technologies in the geographical and sociocultural contexts of indigenous Northwestern Ontario. By introducing the case of KO-KNET I analyse (1) how internet infrastructures act as facilitators of social relationships and (2) how First Nations people actively make their (digital) futures by taking control over the creation, distribution and uses of information and communication technologies (ICT), such as broadband internet. This study is part of a digital media anthropology project that was conducted for five years, including ethnographic fieldwork in Northwestern Ontario and in online environments.

In media and visual anthropology, anthropologists are, among other things of course, interested in how indigenous, disfranchised and marginalized people have started to talk back to structures of power that neglect their political, cultural and economic needs and interests by producing and distributing their own media technologies (e.g., Ginsburg 1991, 2002b, Michaels 1994, Prins 2002, Turner 1992, 2002). To “underscore the sense of both political agency and cultural intervention that people bring to these efforts”, Faye Ginsburg (2002a: 8, 1997) refers to these media practices as “cultural activism”. “Indigenized” media technologies are providing indigenous people with possibilities to make their voices heard, to network and connect, to distribute information, to revitalize culture and language, and to become politically engaged and active (Ginsburg 2002a, 2002b). Particularly digital media technologies offer a lot of these possibilities to marginalized people (e.g., Landzelius 2006a).

Text (PDF)

Free chapter: “We were on the outside looking in”: MyKnet.org – A First Nations Online Social Environment in Northern Ontario

Free chapter: “We were on the outside looking in”: MyKnet.org – A First Nations Online Social Environment in Northern Ontario published on No Comments on Free chapter: “We were on the outside looking in”: MyKnet.org – A First Nations Online Social Environment in Northern Ontario

Bell, B., Budka, P., Fiser, A. 2012. “We were on the outside looking in”: MyKnet.org – A First Nations online social environment in northern Ontario. In A. Clement, M. Gurstein, G. Longford, M. Moll & L. R. Shade (Eds.), Connecting Canadians: Investigations in Community Informatics (pp. 237-254). Edmonton: Athabasca University Press.

“In 2000, one of Canada’s leading Aboriginal community networks, the Kuh-ke-nah Network, or K-Net, was on the verge of expanding into broadband services. (For more on K-Net, see chapter 14.) K-Net’s management organization, Keewaytinook Okimakanak Tribal Council, had acquired funding and resources to become one of Industry Canada’s Smart Communities demonstration projects. Among the innovative services that K-Net introduced at the time was MyKnet.org, a system of personal home pages intended for remote First Nations users in a region of Northern Ontario where numerous communities have lived without adequate residential telecom service well into the millennium (Fiser, Clement, and Walmark 2006; Ramírez et al. 2003). Shortly thereafter, and through K-Net’s community-based Internet infrastructure, this free-of-charge, free-of-advertising, locally supported, online social environment grew from its core constituency of remote First Nations communities to host over 30,000 registered user accounts (of which approximately 20,000 represent active home pages). …”

free chapter download: http://www.aupress.ca/index.php/books/120193

Vortrag: IKT als Werkzeuge zur Reduktion erzwungener Mobilität

Vortrag: IKT als Werkzeuge zur Reduktion erzwungener Mobilität published on No Comments on Vortrag: IKT als Werkzeuge zur Reduktion erzwungener Mobilität

Vortrag im Rahmen der 7. Tage der Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie:Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien (IKT) als Werkzeuge zur Reduktion erzwungener Mobilität” (PDF)

Aus dem Inhalt:

  • Indigene in Kanada & im Nordwestlichen Ontario
  • Sitation von First Nations im Nordwestlichen Ontario
  • Indigene IKT im Nordwestlichen Ontario: KO-KNET
  • Reduktion erzwungener Mobilität durch IKT
  • IKT-Anwendungspraktiken: Isolation vs. Sozialität
  • Indigene IKT: Ergebnisse aktueller Studien

Indigene IKT: Ergebnisse aktueller Studien:

  • IKT-Praktiken beeinflussen …
    a) (kulturelle) Identitätskonstruktion & -verhandlung
    b) (soziale) Vergemeinschaftungsformen & -prozesse
    c) Kommunikationspraktiken
  • Entscheidend sind …
    a) Kontrolle von & Bezug zu IKT
    b) Soziokulturelle, geographische & politische Kontexte/Rahmenbedingungen/Möglichkeiten

Publications, papers & presentations about MyKnet.org

Publications, papers & presentations about MyKnet.org published on No Comments on Publications, papers & presentations about MyKnet.org

This is a list of publications, papers and presentations that results from research on MyKnet.org, an online social environment for First Nations people of northwestern Ontario, Canada. For more information on MyKnet.org and the research project, take a look at the summary of the MyKnet.org research project and the MyKnet.org research website.

Publications

Bell, B., Budka, P. & Fiser, A. 2012. “We were on the outside looking in” – MyKnet.org: A First Nations online social environment in northern Ontario. In Clement, A., Gurstein, M., Longford, G., Moll, M. & Shade, L. R. (Eds.) Connecting Canadians: Investigations in Community Informatics. Edmonton: Athabasca University Press. Forthcoming.

Budka, P. 2009. Indigenous media technology production in northern Ontario, Canada. In Ertler, K.-D. & Lutz, H. (Eds.) Canada in Grainau / Le Canada à Grainau: A multidisciplinary survey of Canadian Studies after 30 years. Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang.

Budka, P., Bell, B., & Fiser, A. 2009. MyKnet.org: How Northern Ontario’s First Nation communities made themselves at home on the World Wide Web. The Journal of Community Informatics, 5(2), Online: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/article/view/568/450

Papers and presentations at conferences

Budka, P. 2011. Connecting First Nations through media and communication technologies in northern Ontario, Canada. Paper at “American Indian Workshop (AIW)”, Graz, Austria: Graz University, 31 March – 3 April.

Budka, P. 2010. Popular culture and music in an indigenous online environment. Paper at “11th Biennial Conference of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA)”, Maynooth, Ireland: National University of Irland Maynooth, 24-27 August.

Budka, P. 2010. Indigene Medienproduktion im Nordwestlichen Ontario, Kanada. Presentation at “Tage der Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie”, Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna, 22 April.

Budka, P. 2009. Die Bedeutung von (kultureller) Identität in einer indigenen Online-Umgebung (MyKnet.org). Paper at “Internet und Identitätskonstruktion von Jugendlichen Workshop”, Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna, 30 October.

Budka, P. 2008. Indigenous territories on the World Wide Web: How First Nation people in Northwestern Ontario make themselves at home online. Paper at “Internet Research 9.0 Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers”, Copenhagen, Denmark: IT University of Copenhagen, 16-18 October.

Budka, P. 2008. Indigenous media technology production in Northern Ontario, Canada. Paper at “10th Biennial Conference of the European Association of Social Anthropologists (EASA)”, Ljubljana, Slovenia: University of Ljubljana, 26-30 August.

Budka, P. 2008. Populärkulturen in einer First Nation Internet Umgebung: Hip Hop als Element jugendlicher Identitätskonstruktion und Repräsentation. Paper at “Wiener Tage der Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie”, Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna, 10-11 April.

Budka, P. 2007. The new mediation of traumatic experiences: the First Nations online environment MyKnet.org and suicides in Northern Ontario, Canada. Paper at “Sites/Cites of Trauma Workshop”, Gothenburg, Sweden:Gothenburg University, 5-6 October.

Budka, P., Grünberg, G., & Trupp, C. 2007. Indigene und Internet in den Amerikas. Ein komparatives medienanthropologisches Projekt. Presentation at “Wiener Tage der Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie”, Vienna, Austria: University of Vienna, 26-27 April.

Bell, B., Budka, P., & Fiser, A. 2007. “We were on the outside looking in” – MyKnet.org: a First Nations online social network in Northern Ontario. Paper at the “5th Canadian Research Alliance for Community Innovation and Networking (CRACIN) Workshop”, Montreal, Canada: Concordia University, 20-22 June.

Report on the MyKnet.org and Facebook Online Survey, April – December 2011

Report on the MyKnet.org and Facebook Online Survey, April – December 2011 published on No Comments on Report on the MyKnet.org and Facebook Online Survey, April – December 2011

Budka, Philipp. 2012. Report on the MyKnet.org and Facebook Online Survey, April-December 2011.
http://meeting.knet.ca/mp19/course/view.php?id=7

Abstract

This report presents and discusses findings of an online survey which aims to contribute to the understanding of First Nation online practices. By looking at two popular web services, MyKnet.org, a regional First Nation homepage environment, and Facebook, the global leader in online social networking, it becomes clear that for the First Nation people of northwestern Ontario the internet is the most important communication medium. These two online services have become ubiquitous media technologies that are used to connect and represent people in this remote region. They are well integrated into people’s daily lives and practices; not only as communication tools, but also as subjects of discussion. As participants to this online survey (N=117) indicate, the popularity of MyKnet.org and Facebook is mainly due to the fact that those online services are easy and free to use for keeping in touch with family and friends. Besides maintaining and fostering social connections, people also utilize MyKnet.org and Facebook to share stories about cultural activities as well as music and videos, which is considered an important cultural practice. Survey results suggest further that while Facebook has replaced MyKnet.org in terms of online communicating and connecting, the Aboriginal online service is still being used for creating and designing web presences as well as for local information gathering and sharing.

The full report (PDF)

Links
MyKnet.org research website
MyKnet.org
KO-KNET

TAZ Artikel “Social Network für Indianer – ‘Wir waren zuerst da!'”

TAZ Artikel “Social Network für Indianer – ‘Wir waren zuerst da!'” published on No Comments on TAZ Artikel “Social Network für Indianer – ‘Wir waren zuerst da!'”

von Sunny Riedel, TAZ, 08.06.2010 (Print, PDF und Online)

“MyKnet ist eine soziale Online-Umgebung von Indianern für Indianer”, erklärt Philipp Budka vom Institut für Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie der Universität Wien. Seit ein paar Jahren forscht er über das Internetportal und dessen Provider Knet.

Das Herzstück ist MyKnet.org, eine Ansammlung von Homepages, über die Angehörige der First Nations, wie sie sich selbst bezeichnen, miteinander kommunizieren.

Wie die meisten Aboriginals werden auch die First Nations stark benachteiligt. Ihre Siedlungen und Reservate sind häufig weit voneinander entfernt, Straßen gibt es kaum. Nur im Winter, wenn Flüsse und Seen zugefroren sind, brausen Trucks über diese “winter roads”. Im Sommer können die Distanzen nur per Flugzeug bewältigt werden. Die fehlende Perspektiven in der Isolationbringt Probleme mit sich. Depressionen, Alkoholismus, Arbeitslosigkeit und eine hohe Selbstmordrate sindAlltag.

“Grund dafür ist die Unterdrückung der First Nations und die Missachtung ihrer Kultur durch die Mehrheitsgesellschaft”, erklärt Philipp Budka. Um das Web 2.0 dafür zu nutzen, die eigene Kultur zu fördern, hatte das Tribal Council, ein Zusammenschluss der politischen Führer der Indigenen, die Organisation Knet 1994 gegründet. Im Jahr 2000 folgte das soziale Netzwerk MyKnet.org.

mehr auf: http://www.taz.de/1/netz/netzkultur/artikel/1/wir-waren-zuerst-da/

Presentation: Indigene Medienproduktion im Nordwestlichen Ontario, Kanada

Presentation: Indigene Medienproduktion im Nordwestlichen Ontario, Kanada published on No Comments on Presentation: Indigene Medienproduktion im Nordwestlichen Ontario, Kanada

Philipp Budka
(Universität Wien)

6. Tage der Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie, Workshop “Medien und Medienkritik aus kultur- und sozialanthropologischer Perspektive”
Insitut für Kultur- und Sozialanthropologie, Universität Wien
22.04.2010

Abstract

Indigene Gruppen, Organisationen und Netzwerke sind weltweit verstärkt daran interessiert ihre soziokulturellen, politischen und ökonomischen Lebensumstände mittels unterschiedlichster Medientechnologien zu kommunizieren. Reichweite und Fokus indigener Medienproduktionen sind dabei ebenso unterschiedlich wie politische, technische und infrastrukturelle Rahmenbedingungen. Dieser Beitrag gibt einen Einblick in die indigene Medienproduktion im Nordwestlichen Ontario, Kanada, unter besonderer Berücksichtigung der historischen, geographischen sowie soziokulturellen Kontexte. Anhand von Fallbeispielen wird einerseits die politische und kulturelle Bedeutung klassischer Massenmedien, wie Zeitung, Radio und Fernsehen, sowie spezieller Kommunikationsmedien, wie Community Radio, für die indigenen Menschen in dieser abgeschiedenen Region aufgezeigt. Andererseits wird der Frage nachgegangen wie indigene BenutzerInnen neuer Medien, wie World Wide Web und Internet, Inhalte selbst produzieren, verändern, reproduzieren und kommunizieren. Weitere Fragen die in diesem Vortrag andiskutiert werden sind: Wie gestaltet sich das Verhältnis von Medientechnologien zu Sprach- und Wissenserwerb bzw. -weitergabe? Welchen Einfluss haben neue Medien auf traditionelle soziale Strukturen? Was bedeutet User-generated Content von persönlichen Homepages für etablierte Massenmedien? Welche Bedeutung haben diese Fallbeispiele indigener Medienproduktion für Österreich?


Indigene Medienproduktion im Nordwestlichen Ontario, Kanada on Prezi

Article: MyKnet.org: How Northern Ontario’s First Nation communities made themselves at home on the World Wide Web

Article: MyKnet.org: How Northern Ontario’s First Nation communities made themselves at home on the World Wide Web published on No Comments on Article: MyKnet.org: How Northern Ontario’s First Nation communities made themselves at home on the World Wide Web

Budka, P., Bell, B., & Fiser, A. 2009. MyKnet.org: How Northern Ontario’s First Nation communities made themselves at home on the World Wide Web. The Journal of Community Informatics, 5(2), Online: http://ci-journal.net/index.php/ciej/article/view/568/450

Abstract

In this article we explore the development of MyKnet.org, a loosely structured system of personal homepages that was established by indigenous communities in the region of Northern Ontario, Canada in 2000. Individuals from over 50 remote First Nations across Northern Ontario have made this free of charge, free of advertisements, locally-driven online social environment their virtual home. MyKnet.org currently comprises over 25,000 active homepages and strongly reflects the demographic and geographic profile of Northern Ontario. It is thus youth-based and built around the communities’ need to maintain social ties across great distances. We draw upon encounters with a range of MyKnet.org’s developers and long time users to explore how this community-developed and community-controlled form of communication reflects life in the remote First Nations. Our focus is on the importance of locality: MyKnet.org’s development was contingent on K-Net, a regional indigenous computerization movement to bring broadband communications to remote First Nations. MyKnet.org is explicitly community-driven and not-for-profit, thus playing an important role in inter- and intra-community interaction in a region that has lacked basic telecommunications infrastructure well into the millennium.

NishTV

NishTV published on 1 Comment on NishTV

NishTV and its founder Richard Ogima are using new and social media services to cover Aboriginal life in Canada and in particular in the region of Northern Ontario, the Nishnawbe Aski Nation. It broadcasts positive and inspiring messages about issues that concern Aboriginal people, e.g. homelessness in Vancouver in connection with the Olympics in 2010, or the challenge of losing weight. And NishTV reports from events and happenings in the Aboriginal communities, e.g. the 2009 Pow-Wow in Thunder Bay.

from http://www.nishtv.com/about-nishtv

NishTV is Northern Ontario’s hottest website that captures the heartbeat of the Anishinabek Community. We use video-media in a youthful, trendy and positive way to give the Native experience more zest and coolness. Our aim is to represent and give exposure to those cool people who never get recognized for the things they are doing or who need a little exposure because they are stepping out in the community with arts, leadership, business or other creative projects.
….

more at:
http://www.nishtv.com
http://www.youtube.com/user/nishtv?gl=CA&hl=en

Pelican Falls First Nation High School

Pelican Falls First Nation High School published on No Comments on Pelican Falls First Nation High School

Auf dem Gebiet der Lac Seul First Nation befindet sich die Pelican Falls First Nation High School, die ausschließlich für Schüler aus den indigenen Gemeinschaften der Nishnawbe Aski errichtet wurde. Administrativ und organisatorisch ist die Schule somit dem Northern Nishnawbe Education Council unterstellt.

Neben Fächern wie Englisch oder Mathematik werden auch Kurse angeboten, die speziell für die First Nation SchülerInnen entwickelt wurden, wie Sprachunterrricht zum Erlernen der indigenen Sprachen (Ojibwe, Ojicree und Cree) oder Werkzeugunterricht zum Erstellen von traditionellen Werkzeugen und Produkten, wie Kanus oder Tierfallen. So soll indigene Kultur und Wissen auch im institutionellen Rahmen einer Schule weitergeben werden.

Neben der Schule gibt es in Pelican Falls auch Unterkünfte in denen die Kinder in kleinen Gruppen untergebracht sind. Jedes dieser Häuser wird von speziell geschulten SozialarbeiterInnen betreut, die den Schülern helfen sollen sich in der ungewohnten Umgebung zurecht zu finden und wohl zu fühlen.

Wichtige Bestandteile dieser Unterkünfte sind Computerarbeitsplätze, die vor allem genutzt werden um mit Freunden und Familie in den Heimatgemeinschaften in Kontakt zu bleiben. Das von K-Net angebotene Homepage-Hostingservice MyKnet.org spielt dabei eine ganz entscheidende Rolle.

Lac Seul First Nation

Lac Seul First Nation published on No Comments on Lac Seul First Nation

Lac Seul First Nation (Obishikokaang) liegt etwa 40 km nordwestlich von Sioux Lookout und besteht aus den drei Gemeinschaften/Siedlungen Frenchman’s Head, Kejick Bay und Whitefish Bay. Lac Seul ist das älteste Reservat im Sioux Lookout District und gehört der Independent First Nations Alliance an.

Während im Sommer Kejick Bay ausschließlich über den See – den Lac Seul – mit Booten zu erreichen ist, wird im Winter der zugefrorene See als Straße verwendet. Auch die kleinste Gemeinschaft – Whitefish Bay – ist im Winter wesentlich einfacher und schneller zu erreichen.

Bis 1929 bildeten Kejick Bay und Whitefish Bay eine gemeinsame Siedlung am Festland. Durch die Überflutung großer Teile des Festlands durch “Ontario Hydro”, einen regionalen Stromerzeuger, wurde Kejick Bay zu einer Insel und viele Familien verließen die Siedlung und das Reservat. Heute leben etwa zwei Drittel der Mitglieder der Lac Seul First Nation nicht mehr im Reservat sondern beispielsweise in den Städten Red Lake und Sioux Lookout.

In Kejick Bay befindet sich im Gebäude der ehemaligen Band Office das sogenannte “Access Center”, das Mitgliedern der Gemeinde Computer und Internet zur Verfügung stellt, etwa um mit Freunden und Verwandten in anderen Gemeinschaften und Regionen in Kontakt zu bleiben. Die Räumlichkeiten werden aber ebenso für Workshops und Schulungen verwendet.

Canada Day in Sioux Lookout

Canada Day in Sioux Lookout published on No Comments on Canada Day in Sioux Lookout
Canada Day wird – zumindest im englischsprachigen Kanada – gerne mit einem Feuerwerk gefeiert. Der Nationalfeiertag soll an die Etablierung Kanadas als selbstständiges Land bzw. Union am 1. Juli anno 1867 erinnern.

Ich verbrachte diesen, diesmal leider regnerischen, Feiertag mit einem Ausflug im Kanu und einem Wohltätigkeitsfischessen am öffentlichen Strand von Sioux Lookout. Abends bestaunte ich dann das Feuerwerk, das für die zahlreichen Zuschauer in der Nähe des Strandes gezündet wurde.

Essen in Torontos China Town

Essen in Torontos China Town published on No Comments on Essen in Torontos China Town

China Town in Toronto erstreckt sich vor allem entlang der Dundas Street West zwischen Spadina Avenue und University Avenue. Ein chinesisches Geschäft neben dem anderen: chinesische Musik, chinesische Kleidung, chinesische Kräuter und chinesische Medizin. Und nicht zu vergessen: chinesisches Essen.

Auf der Such nach eben diesem, kehrte ich auf der Spadina Avenue in ein Lokal ein, das sich der Dim Sum Küche rühmt. Nachdem ich auf meinen Platz geleitet wurde, bekam ich einen Zettel in die Hand gedrückt auf dem der Gast sein Essen auswählen und die gewünschte Menge angeben soll. Ich entschied mich für gedämpfte Rindfleischbällchen, gefüllte Teigtaschen mit Shrimps sowie eine andere Version der Teigtäschchen mit Gemüse und Schweinefleich. Da ich eigentlich nur eine Kleinigkeit essen wollte, entschloß ich mich jeweils nur zwei dieser gedämpften Köstlichkeiten zu bestellen.

Nachdem ich vom vorzüglichen Tee getrunken und das Restaurant und seine Gäste etwas ausführlicher betrachtet hatte, erschien eine Kellnerin und brachte zwei Körbchen auch Holz, die sie mir geöffnet vorsetzte. In beiden befanden sich jeweils drei gedämpfte Fleischbällchen von der Größe eines Marillenknödels. Während ich mich noch über die scheinbare Ähnlichkeit der drei bestellten Gerichte wunderte, brachten mir zwei andere eilfertige Kellner noch vier weitere Körbchen mit insgesamt zwölf Teigtäschchen. Mein knapper Kommentar, dass ich das niemals aufessen könne, wurde höflich überhört und nur ein neben mir sitzender Gast meinte, dass ich offensichtlich einen sehr großen Hunger haben müsse. Anstatt der, so wie ich glaubte, sechs Dim Sum Spezialitäten musste ich also mit achtzehn kulinarischen Leckerbissen kämpfen. Nachdem ich zehn gegessen hatte, gab ich den Kampf auf und ließ mir die übrigen einpacken, um diese dann am Abend kalt zu verzehren. Schmeckte übrigens vorzüglich und machte mir durchaus Appetit auf weitere Besuche in den chinesischen Lokalen Torontos.

KORI

KORI published on No Comments on KORI

Das Keewaytinook Okimakanak (Northern Chiefs) Council gründete 2004 ein Forschungsinstitut, um die Bedürfnisse der indigenen Gemeinschaften wissenschaftlich fundiert und unabhängig von externen Forschungseinrichtungen erheben zu können. Schwerpunkt in den Untersuchungen und Studien von KORI (KO Research Institute), das seinen Sitz in Thunder Bay hat, ist die kulturell und sozial adäquate Verwendung und Entwicklung von Informations- und Kommunikationstechnologien innerhalb der unterschiedlichen Programme und Initiativen von KO:

  • Telehealth (Gesundheitsvorsorge und -Betreuung mittels Internet)
  • Bildung (mittels E-Learning)
  • Vernetzung indigener Gemeinschaften mittels Breitbandinternet und Satellitenverbindung

img_0615KORI-Mitarbeiter inspizieren die Errichtung einer Komponente eines WLAN-Netzwerkes auf einem Haus in Thunder Bay

KORI bietet auf seiner Website diverse Unterlagen, Dokumente und Informationen, die von Mitarbeitern des Instituts gesammelt und ständig erweitert werden. So findet sich unter diesen Ressourcen etwa auch eine vorläufige Version eines Leitfadens für sozialwissenschaftliche Forschung innerhalb und mit den indigenen Gemeinschaften der Region.