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Article: How “real life” issues affect the social life of online networked communities

Article: How “real life” issues affect the social life of online networked communities published on No Comments on Article: How “real life” issues affect the social life of online networked communities

Budka, Philipp. 2008. How “real life” issues affect the social life of online networked communities. In C. Trupp & P. Budka (Eds.), Austrian Studies in Social Anthropology – Sondernummer KSA-Tage 2007 (Workshop Medien und Film), June 2008, 50-61.
Online: http://www.univie.ac.at/alumni.ethnologie/journal/abstract/budka.html

Abstract

Speaking of “the internet”, one often forgets that this is not a monolithic media technology, but a whole range of applications embedded in the life of people practicing these technologies. This paper explores on the one hand the social life of a publicly accessible mailing list that connects various indigenous and non-indigenous persons to form a global electronic network. On the other hand, it analyses a Usenet newsgroup, which is dedicated to the socio-cultural life in Austria. With the help of two cyberanthropological case studies the interconnections between “real life” or offline issues and “virtual” or online lives on mailing lists and newsgroups is demonstrated. The paper intends to show that “virtual life” never can be separated from “real life” and its issues.

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Australia Decides to Sign Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

Australia Decides to Sign Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples published on No Comments on Australia Decides to Sign Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples

from Cultural Survival

When the United Nations General Assembly voted on the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples in 2007, only four countries voted against it: the United States, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia. Today, the Rudd government in Australia announced that it would endorse the declaration. The original vote on the declaration was largely the result of the tireless efforts of Cultural Survival board member Les Melezer, and Melezer played a key role in today’s announcement by the Rudd government: he has been in New York for two weeks putting pressure on the Australian ambassador. For more on the decision, click here or here.

Australia apologies to Indigenous Peoples

Australia apologies to Indigenous Peoples published on No Comments on Australia apologies to Indigenous Peoples

From the New York Times:

Prime Minister Kevin Rudd opened a new chapter in Australia’s tortured relations with its indigenous peoples on Wednesday with a comprehensive and moving apology for past wrongs and a call for bipartisan action to improve the lives of Australia’s Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders.

“The Parliament is today here assembled to deal with this unfinished business of the nation, to remove a great stain from the nation’s soul, and in a true spirit of reconciliation to open a new chapter in the history of this great land, Australia,” Mr. Rudd told Parliament.
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From the National Indigenous Times:

They jumped, whooped and hollered on the lawns of Parliament in Canberra following the apology to the Stolen Generations read by Prime Minister Kevin Rudd this morning.

The long overdue apology was the one of the first issues of business for the 42nd Parliament of Australia.

The declaration itself read concisely and made its message clear, yet as the Prime Minister Kevin Rudd’s voice wore on with more personal anecdotes, the mood of the 5,000 strong crowd turned from one of quiet celebration to one of outright sorrow.

Tears were hard to hold back as members of the Stolen Generations that weren’t inside Parliament House openly wept during the speech that will be remembered for many years to come.
(…)

Rudd’s speech on ABC.
The full apology in The Sidney Morning Herald.